I agree that it a little disheartening to find out that the value isn immediately apparent to the experts in those blind tests. I curious to know two more values that weren mentioned, and possibly can be tested. Perhaps the strads were just far superior to any other contemporary instruments made at that time, and sense then have been imitated so much that these modern versions are really a chip off the block that Stradivari developed.

It is used for heart disease, hardening of the arteries, preventing clots in veins and arteries, heart attack, stroke, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, irregular heartbeat after surgery, inadequate blood flow that causes blood to pool in the legs, and to help medications used for chest pain to work longer. It is also thought that vitamin C may increase the healing of burns, ulcers, fractures, and other wounds. Vitamin C is also used to prevent long term pain after surgery or injury.

25 and Sept. 8. Both test results were negative, Spence said. The Newfoundland Herald called them biggest rock ‘n’ roll band in the province, while The Daily News raved: have the beat, the rhythm, the songs and most of all, what it takes, the talent. Three guitars and an excellent drummer, they call themselves The Ravens . Night club and dance enthusiasts from all over the Avalon Peninsula are beginning to talk about The Ravens and even class them as the tops in the city.

Some highly complex interventions, such as the Sure Start intervention to support families with young children in deprived communities,8 may comprise a set of individually complex interventions.Box 1 What makes an intervention complex?Number of interacting components within the experimental and control interventionsNumber and difficulty of behaviours required by those delivering or receiving the interventionNumber of groups or organisational levels targeted by the interventionNumber and variability of outcomesDegree of flexibility or tailoring of the intervention permittedHow these characteristics are dealt with will depend on the aims of the evaluation. A key question in evaluating complex interventions is whether they are effective in everyday practice (box 2).9 It is therefore important to understand the whole range of effects and how they vary, for example, among recipients or between sites. A second key question in evaluating complex interventions is how the intervention works: what are the active ingredients and how are they exerting their effect? Answers to this kind of question are needed to design more effective interventions and apply them appropriately across group and setting.10Box 2 Developing and evaluating complex studiesA good theoretical understanding is needed of how the intervention causes change, so that weak links in the causal chain can be identified and strengthenedLack of effect may reflect implementation failure (or teething problems) rather than genuine ineffectiveness; a thorough process evaluation is needed to identify implementation problemsVariability in individual level outcomes may reflect higher level processes; sample sizes may need to be larger to take account of the extra variability and cluster randomised designs consideredA single primary outcome may not make best use of the data; a range of measures will be needed and unintended consequences picked up where possibleEnsuring strict standardisation may be inappropriate; the intervention may work better if a specified degree of adaptation to local settings is allowed for in the protocolBest practice is to develop interventions systematically, using the best available evidence and appropriate theory, then to test them using a carefully phased approach, starting with a series of pilot studies targeted at each of the key uncertainties in the design, and moving on to an exploratory and then a definitive evaluation.